Tag Archives: Judith Briles

Money Fears … #3 The Fear of Talking About Money

#3 … The Fear of Talking About Money

Upbringing is a key factor that shapes your money practices.  Most adults “wish” that they had had training and guidance about money and investing as they grew up.

If you grew up in a family that openly discussed money and its many facets, you’re in the minority.  Not all of your friends will be on the same wave link as you are in money matters.  Your awareness, and possibly non-intimidation to the topic, may actually intimidate them!

Over the next several weeks, I’ll continue to post the top fear factors for today … to overcome your fear, and get back on track, get your copy of Money Smarts for Turbulent Times by Judith Briles–available in paper and ebook format.

#2 Money Fear … The Fear of Losing Money

#2 Money Fear … The Fear of Losing Money

At some point, everyone loses money.  It can be from a bad investment, misplacing moneys, inflation erosion, failure to act or make a decision on your investments, making the wrong decision, losing a job or other resource of funds.  It happens.

One advantage that many men have over women deals with attitude—women are more likely to be fearful of not being able to “make up” lost money; men more often believe that they can make it up/replace it the next go around.  All is lost, it’s part of the “game.”

Over the next several weeks, I’ll continue to post the top fear factors for today … to overcome your fear, and get back on track, get your copy of Money Smarts for Turbulent Times by Judith Briles–available in paper and ebook format.

Money Fear #1 – The Fear of Being Broke

#1 … The Fear of Being Broke

At the top of the list is the fear of being broke, “Will I have enough to buy the foods I want, the medications I need or be able to pay for the things I want to do when I stop working?”

Years ago, a client had asked me if I would take the time to go visit his mother.  He told me that she had some investments, lived mostly off the dividends, interest and her monthly Social Security.  He asked that I just check in with to see if she was getting a decent return on her portfolio. 

I made the appointment and spent a pleasant two hours getting to know Martha.  She was in her early sixties at the time and healthy. She believed that she was a good steward of her money.  With financial data filled out, I promised to get back to her within the week with an update on several stocks and suggestions for any changes to her portfolio.  As I got up to leave, she said, “What about my stash?” 

She pointed the corner of her living room.  All I saw was a big green, over-stuffed chair.  “My stash . . . in the chair. . . and drapes.” 

My new client had stashed in excess of $30,000 over the years in her over stuffed green chair with matching draperies.  She had lived through the Depression—never again would she, or her family, be without food if bad times hit again.  It took me over a year to convince her to move her moneys to a money market fund that would earn her interest. 

Did she move the entire amount?  Nope, she insisted on a stash of $5,000 in the house, money that she could tap into for “whatever.”

The reality is that whether you are rich, poor, or in-between, the person that you are going to have to depend the most on to keep you from the poorhouse is you and your smarts.

Over the next several weeks, I’ll be posting the top fear factors for today … to overcome your fear, and get back on track, get your copy of Money Smarts for Turbulent Times by Judith Briles–available in paper and ebook format.

Money Fears … Most Have a Few, What’s Yours?

Most Have a Few . . . What’s Yours? 

The average person works 10,000 days during her career (that’s 40 years if you do the math).  How much time are you willing to commit to figuring out what to do with the money you make? Or how to make it grow? And what about determining what you need to support you when you step away from your nursing career?

No one is born with a fear or attitude about money, yet you have some.  Fears and attitudes—be they good, bad, or ugly—develop over time.  No doubt, your upbringing is a major contributing factor.  Past experiences—successes and failures—also play a critical role, as does society and your surroundings—the media, friends, family even how the government spends, creates and takes away moneys and programs are factors.

The Current Money Fiasco

Over the last few years, millions have felt some form of financial squeeze.  For some, it was an unbelievable financial disaster that caught then totally off guard.

 Thousands daily lost their jobs, their homes, their life savings—here yesterday, gone today.  Poof … it felt like it was an overnight happening.

 Fat 401(k) accounts were slashed to a fraction of what they were just months earlier; homes that many counted on to yield a hefty part of their retirement seed plummeted in value; and the credit markets turned venomous. The perfect storm. Financial scandals, scams and corruption fermented everywhere. And fear … unbelievable fear.

 The Fear Factors
Understanding your money personality, your spending habits, your needs and wants and what may be hindering you from achieving your goals are critical factors in creating financial independence.  Dealing with money fears that are blockers to success are a key ingredient to building assets.

Over the next several weeks, I’ll be posting the top fear factors for today … to overcome your fear, and get back on track, get your copy of Money Smarts for Turbulent Times by Judith Briles–available in paper and ebook format.

Carefronting Employees in Your Midst …

Carefronting Employees in Your Midst …

 You’ve been recently promoted to manager of your department.  You loved being on staff, but the management role hasn’t been what you expected.  Your pre-management department friends seem to have new expectations from you (as you do from them).  The camaraderie you relished for the past two years has almost disappeared. 

 On top of that, Bertha, one of the best employees you’ve ever worked with seems to have had a personality transplant.  She routinely challenges your authority, grumbles about anything and everything, and appears to be the creator of some of the conflict your department is experiencing.

The quickest way to reduce red ink culpraits is to address them when inappropriate behavior surfaces. Your reward for resolution is increased retention, higher productivity, increased patient satisfaction and a less stressful workplace. 

Your solution cycle starts with observation, communication, confrontation and spelling out clearly what the consequence is if the behavior continues.

  1. Recognize that soft skills—effective communication and conflict resolution— are as critical as clinical skills.
  2. Make effective confronting a habit, not something that is done as a last resort.
  3. Teach communication and conflict resolution to everyone on staff.
  4. Identify Red Ink styles and behaviors and confront them immediately.
  5. Let marginal employees go.  Learn to de-hire.
  6. Create a no tolerance zone—bad behaviors are not tolerated or allowed.  Period.

 Don’t concentrate on being the “employer of choice.”  Instead, become the Employer of Choice of Choice Employees.  The real choice should be to keep the keepers and lose the losers.  The end result is a healthier workplace . . . a win-win for all.