Category Archives: Newsletter

Summer 2007

Research has been an important factor in all of my books. Here’s your chance to give your input on Workplace Ethics: Sabotage, Abusive/Bully Behaviors. The results of the survey will be part of Stabotage! Dealing with the Pit Bulls, Snakes, Scorpions and Slugs in the Workplace

Pass the Survey word…Tell your colleagues and friends to participate as well—the more the better. You should be able to click on the link below to get you there. If there is a glitch, then copy and paste the URL below in your browser get to the Survey—it will take about 10 minutes. Thanks so much.

Take the Survey
http://www.surveymonkey.com/s.aspx?sm=8fwwFDsxaBvLH%2fepH3OqZQ%3d%3d

Judith’s Take …

Lose the Losers and Keep the Keepers

Sometimes it’s hard to pinpoint the breaking point when you decide that enough is enough. Whether you’ve been overlooked for a promotion, put down by a coworker or manager or work in a toxic workplace, you’ve decided that you are out of there.

The excuse you give, and it is usually an excuse and not the real reason, is that you want to work closer to home, need more family time or have a better opportunity. Not that all of those are reasonable—they are rarely the core reason why you depart.

Truth be told, the real reason is tied to something else that has built up over time. It’s not about the money, the commute, or family balance. In the workplace, goodbyes usually take a long time in coming.

The bureaucracy of the organization, system frustrations, not being given the appropriate tools to do a job effectively, working within an environment that supports mediocrity or with managers who have no business managing or just not being appreciated usually leads the list of what ails the workplace.

For the employee, it could be the toxic coworker that your manager fails or refuses to deal with; it could be your input has never been solicited and management dictates things that directly affect you and your productivity and are counter-productive to it; it could be that you are invisible, leaving no window for advancement, stretching your talents or even given training opportunities; or it could be that the art of respect isn’t practiced.

For the manager, it could be that no matter what you do, HR won’t support you in terminating the low-performing employee; it could be that your recommendations are routinely shot down at management meetings; it could be that the hour expectations are outrageous; it could be that no matter how good employees are, the door to advancement is closed to them (and maybe you) because of nepotism; or it could be that general respect and appreciation is missing.

By the time most people make the decision to leave, their loyalty factor to the organization has diminished to such a level that it would take a tsunami to alter it. For too many companies, their workplace slogan could be: We Keep Our Losers and Lose Our Keepers.

Replacing people costs money…lots of it.
How much? Most HR pros factor in 100-150 percent of the annual compensation for the person being replaced. You may ask, “Why so much and where do those moneys go to?”

Most people don’t know. An employer may have to pay recruiting fees, advertising costs related to the position, new training (or re-training), orientation expenses, moving expenses, sign-on bonuses, overtime to current staff or temp help until a permanent replacement comes in all add up to a tidy sum. There is some down time with the rest of the staff when the new person comes on board (and there is down time pre and post because everyone is talking about the vacancy factor and/or can the new team member do the work, etc.).

So, how do you circumvent the goodbyes of the workplace, and keep the keepers?

It starts with tuning and getting rid of what disconnects people—intervene and prevent them.
It starts with learning what the true culture of the workplace or team is.
It starts with finding out what the unwritten rules of the workplace are.
Sure, businesses have mission statements—most post them in the lobby; some print them on the back of business cards.

Mission statements always sound great. Ask, how closely do they model the behavior of what management and employees do? Are the written word and the behavior and actions in synch or are they in contrast of each other?

The answers are usually not close enough and they are out of synch.

Unhappy folks—be they on the employee side or management—will list communication snafus at the top of their list—missed, incomplete, wrong, none, too little and too late.

Workplaces should only have a few ways to communicate: verbal, written, or virtual. Of course, there are variations. Too many think that they can do it in a telepathic mode. Which means there’s none.

The key is to do it and do it timely, completely and with respect. And however it is done, to make sure that everyone is on the same page and understands the how-tos and what-fors. When communication is open, the disconnects disappear.

Do some digging—the unwritten rules of the workplace rule. Think—what did you wish you had been told when you first started working…and you learned via the hard knock route?

Was it one of the “pew” rules—a chair, pen, mug, parking place, desk—anything that someone else could perceive as “mine” and that you used by mistake?

There are rules dealing with employees who have kids and those that don’t (it’s amazing how so many managers seem to think that singles or those without kids can push the longer hours nor do they have other responsibilities); rules dealing with working with other departments; rules that imply how you have to deal with coworkers habits (smokers may get to take more breaks); rules that deal with housekeeping and cleaning up (anything in the refrigerator is fair game), etc., etc.

A savvy manager and employee will take the time to probe and find out all the nuances of what makes the workplace tick. Then, share them with others.

For a manager, if there is an employee who doesn’t fit; who plays games and pits worker against worker or withholds information that could be vital to a job, start the process to de-hire.

For an employee, if there is a manager who doesn’t respect you; who plays games and pits worker against worker or withholds information that could be vital to a job, start the process to de-hire yourself.

Today’s workplace slogan should be this: Lose the Losers and Keep the Keepers. It’s that simple.

Judith’s Take; Fluffy Resume’s are in the Midst

It’s not uncommon to get the career itch in the summer…is it time to move to where it’s not so hot (or cool)? I’m sick of the mosquitoes, give me the desert or I can make more money on the West Coast. Or maybe you just can’t stand the new CEO.

If you decide it’s time to see what’s out there and determine if the grass is really greener, make sure that what you put in print is squeaky clean. It’s easy to fudge sometimes about what you created, contributed or earned. Don’t. The magnifying glasses are out when looking at management and leadership candidates.

Early this year, the embattled President and CEO of RadioShack finally tossed in the towel and resigned. Why? Resume padding, simple and bold.

“Resume padding,” you ask — what’s that? Plain, old-fashioned lying.

RadioShack’s David Edmondson’s resume claimed that he had received two degrees from schools that stated they had no record of his graduating. Records showed he had attended a couple of semesters, but never offered degrees in the areas that Edmondson claimed he had earned one in.

With public rumors circulating about Edmondson’s credibility, RadioShack decided to launch an investigation by researching his resume. With the heat on, he resigned.

Some may think, “Well, so what, he was doing a great job for RadioShack—what’s a degree anyway, it’s results that count.” Others will disagree. “If they lie on a resume, what else will they lie about?”

RadioShack’s Board agreed with the later…they felt that it was critical to restore the company’s credibility. Edmondson was out.

Lying on resumes isn’t an exclusive of the corporate workplace. It happens everywhere, including sports and academia.

A few years ago, the newly hired basketball coach of the University of Louisiana was given the pink slip. The school learned that Glynn Cyprien’s claim of a degree from an accredited university that was claimed on his resume was a myth. Ditto for George O’Leary who was exposed just a week after he was hired as Notre Dame’s football coach.

It’s not just a guy thing. Sandra Baldwin stepped down as president of the U. S. Olympic Committee after it was learned that the PhD in English she claimed on her resume didn’t exist, nor did she graduate from the Colorado school she claimed she had.

According to www.ResumeDoctor.com, a resume advisory service, over 43 percent of resumes have inaccuracies in them. Some can be a wrong date; others claims/credentials that are non-existence.

It may be viewed that exaggerating a tad will move you up the ladder faster, or get you hired ahead of others. There’s a belief that you won’t get caught — similar to athletes who use performance-enhancing drugs.

What’s a manager to do if she suspects an employee (or potential) isn’t all what was initially presented? What’s an employee to do who’s boosted his or her resume a bit?

For managers, don’t accept all that is written. Get out the phone and call references, check claimed degrees, credentials, writings and awards. Let the Internet by an ally, especially with young people.

Do a “random testing” of employee’s resumes…even those who’ve been with you for five, even ten years. Most employers don’t put enough teeth in their policies. If something is amiss, it’s time for a one-on-one. If you determined that they lied, they don’t belong on your team. Be gone.

The Internet can be very revealing about a potential employee, especially the under 25 crowd. Websites, such as www.MySpace.com, www.Facebook.cm, www.Tagged.com, www.Bebo.com, www.Bolt.com and www.Friendster.com should be routinely checked for blogs and comments that could be viewed as negative or risky.

As the largest, www.MySpace.com has over 65 million digital subscribers. Over 150,000 new users register each day. They chat about anything and everything…maybe it should be called BlabSpace.com. Many have not made it past the interview process because of questionable postings that have been put up when checked by a manager or HR professional.

Your next senior executive is not going to be found on one of these sites. But, on the plus side, recruiters have also sought out entry-level and mid-level managers. Recruiters have also learned that this is a great way to “remote” recruit new hires.

For employees and job-seekers, be smart with any postings that you put on the Internet, especially if you are ticked about something. With search engines, it’s not hard to find out what someone’s position is.

When completing a resume, many job applicants don’t hit the mark because they fail to target their resume to the employer. Instead of making 500 copies, do some customization. You’ve got a computer or access to one—personalize it. Tweak it so that your background fits with the company. You want that piece of paper to say, “I’m what you are looking for and here’s my background to support it.”

Forget about fluffing up a resume. After all, if the shoe was on the other foot, would you hire someone who lied on their resume?”

Most who fudge on their resume don’t find their names and deeds on the front page of the business section of the newspaper. But they could lose they job they prize the most. Don’t you.

Judith’s Take; Changing Careers . . . Is it for You?

When it comes to working and careers, data says that you aren’t going to be doing what you are doing throughout your workplace lifetime.

If I’m any example, I’ve been a retail clerk, nurses aide, secretary, stock broker, financial planner, hotel operator, developer, syndicator, author, trainer and speaker. And, my time in the workplace is not coming to a close. The retail clerk, nurses aide, secretary and hotel operator were all jobs–nothing I viewed as a career and areas that didn’t have a lot of vested time.

Stock brokering, financial planning, developer and sydicator consumed 14 years with authoring, training and speaking totaling 30. Granted, the authoring and speaking part overlapped some of the financial planning years. Still, as a secretary in my early twenties, I would never have guessed I would be doing what I do today, and working primarily in the industry that I do.

Is There a Transition in You?

How about you? Thinking about a change in your work path? Have you ever asked yourself, “What am I doing here?” or “What was I thinking when I decided to be a _______?”

So, why are you doing what you now do? Probably because one of your parents did the same; a school counselor told you that you would be good at it; or you were uncertain what you wanted to be, so you took a degree in something that at least looked interesting.

Some people like changing jobs. They may be career job-hoppers. Most people are not crazy about leaving one job for another. Whatever the reason, you may be feeling that you want out. Before you take the leap, determine why you want out.

Start with Small Steps

There’s always some risk. Always. The steady, certain paycheck may not be so certain. Co-workers who’ve become friends aren’t there. Your new routine may not feel so routine. Most think that they have to take the leap all at once.

Tweak your thinking. Why not do it in steps? If it doesn’t feel right, you can detour in another direction. Think evolution–it may take months, even years to get the ideal spot. I love what I do–writing books, training others on their content and speaking. Getting to here from “there” was an evolution that started back in 1974 when I taught my first class on investments and money management.

Nothing happened overnight. What started the real shift? An accident that left me paralyzed for many months. During that down time, I determined that I no longer loved what I was doing. When I got back up–my way of thinking, it was never an option that I was going to stay down–I wanted to move in another direction. The question was, where?

If you’ve got the bug to move on, the question you must ask is, “Why do you want to leave?” Is it the industry, the workplace, the management–all of them? For me, it was management.

Roll up your sleeves and do some probing. What do you like? What are the skills that you currently use at work? Do you have skills and talents that are not used in your job? Is there a hobby that you have, or use to have, that could be revisited? How about your own wish list–is there something you’ve always wanted to do, but for whatever reason, haven’t?

One of my friends has a double PhD in communications and hypnotherapy. She hated the travel that her work required of her. Her goal was to combine her credentialed skills with her desire to work in the sports area–and, she is not a jock!

Today, with a bit of creativity, she has transformed herself to working exclusively in golf. Leading clinics for private clubs and clients, she does a huge amount of her work on the phone from her condo on a golf course. She is known as the invisible secret for many of the pros seen on the tournament circuit.

She explored her skills, her talents, her desire to change what she was doing and look at a variety of options when she started mixing and matching what she could do and what she didn’t want to do.

Crossing the Bridge

You start there too. What are your options? What steps do you need to take to kick-start your new career phase?

The Department of Labor publishes the Occupational Outlook Handbook–get a copy. Also,

Network in the area that looks promising to you–are their any associations where you can attend a meeting to learn more? How about the local Chamber of Commerce? If your city has a Business Journal (i.e. Denver, San Francisco, Seattle, etc.) check out the “Leads” section –there’s lots of ideas and contacts.
Don’t forget the Internet and the library for gathering info.
Find a mentor in the area that you want to work within–having someone show you the ropes is a huge bonus.
Will you need new credentials and skills?
If so, what will the time and cost requirements be?
Is there anyway that you can shadow someone who already works in the field?
Is part-time work available? Volunteering?
Realize that what you end up doing may not be in a government manual. It may not even be identified as an occupation…until someone creates it. Don’t get in over your head until you’ve done some assessing–the pros and cons, the risks and costs (both emotional and financial). And certainly, the rewards.

Few things happen overnight. Start with the small steps. Collectively, the bridge can be crossed.

 

Do You Know Anyone Getting a Divorce?

The Holidays are always a challenge. For anyone with a fractured relationship, it can sink the ship.

In the 70s and 80s, I headed a financial planning firm in California. Many of the clients I worked with were planning a divorce, in the middle of one or just trying to pick up the pieces post one. From that, my first book on divorce, The Dollars and Sense of Divorce was published. Its genesis was a client where I discovered over a million dollars had been “spirited” away.

The current version is all new, updated and co-authored with my good friend Carol Ann Wilson. Carol Ann has been a pioneer in divorce work, creating the training and certification for divorce planning and expert courtroom testimony. She has two websites that warrant your attention. They are:

http://www.divorceassistant.com

http://www.carolannwilson.com/0.html?cat=15504

Her books and other resources are musts for anyone going through a divorce. If not for you, think of your friends who might be. Divorce is not fun–it’s stressful and can turn your keen mind into bubble gum.

Staying Visible, Rules for the Workplace and Martha

Over the summer, I’ve had several print interviews–magazines that range from Cosmopolitan, InStyle, to Fitness. All on the same topics–women, power, sabotage, conflict and bullying.

The topic of Martha Stewart always surfaces. What do I think, what do other woman say/think, and was Martha targeted?

The thousands that I’ve interacted with since Marthagate birthed said basically that the outcome stinks; that she was targeted because she was, well, Martha; that there are gender issues at play (many said that they like to see a list of men who’ve been prosecuted and jailed under the same circumstances); that it’s OK and assumed that men will be aggressive and cheered for been assertive and women–the Marthas–will be labeled as bitches, egomaniacs, arrogant and selfish; and, that it was scary to be visibly successful.

Visibly successful? Can high visibility be a handicap to one’s career?

Since the mid-eighties, my research has shown that the more visible you are and the more successful you are, or perceived to be, the more often people will try to take you down. Women and men have shared those opinions and thoughts about sabotage in the workplace, failure, success and rebuilding confidence in my books Woman to Woman 2000 (New Horizon Press) and The Confidence Factor (Mile High Press).

In one of the magazine interviews, I shared a story about a dinner I had had with several women just after Martha had been convicted. They represented a variety of career categories–from attorney, to directors of a not-for-profit and a women’s shelter, educators, psychologist, even a recent grad of a local university.

All had talked about the mercurial position of Martha Stewart.

No one wanted to be in Stewart’s shoes; no one supported the verdict; and no one wanted her to go to jail. When I probed further and asked, “Do you think she was targeted?” All said yes. “Because she was a woman?” Yes again. “Do you think the verdict was appropriate?” Absolutely not. “Do you think there is any message–be it subtle or bold–for women?” Yes–don’t be visible.

Ouch, ouch, ouch. Here I’ve been telling women to pat themselves on the back, to bravo their successes and accomplishments . . . and if they don’t, others will take the credit. To be invisible, that hurts. Everyone.

Does that mean that if you are successful, others will target you . . . by prosecutors if it could be politically smart for them to do so? Maybe. Many in my audiences and readers of my books have shared that that is exactly what they endured along their career paths. As women, successful and visible women, there were plenty non-supporters tossing roadblocks their way. My dinner partners echoed the same.

So, what does one do as you transition along your career paths? All the women at my table said that they were fearful of being visible–high visibility can be a handicap. They wanted to continue to succeed, but public accolades wouldn’t be sought. As I listened, I said, “It sounds as though women should proceed with caution, moving stealthily.” All heads looked at me and nodded yes–being stealthy was the perfect word.

Are there different rules for women than there are for men when it comes to success, visibility, even celebrity? Women are saying so.

My advice and rules would be multi for women; and it would be the same advice I would tell a man:

Do the best you can–why bother if you can’t;
Take credit for your work and acknowledge those who contribute to it and along your career pathway;
Be kind to all two and four legged critters–it takes far more of your energy to be pissy;
Tell the truth–it’s so much easier and less complicated;
If you can’t remember all the details, say so–it’s not a crime to say you can’t remember (and as you get older, this happens more often!);
If you are someone who is on a ladder heading toward the clouds and/or ego wanting public recognition, expect potshots;
Ask for advice and help–very, very few are successful without a mentor or two.
Career paths are like elevators–they do go up, they do go down at times and sometimes they stay on a floor too long;
Give back–sharing your skills, talents and vision with others usually comes in a round trip package.
Don’t try to personalize everything (men don’t) and
Don’t divulge information to just anyone (it’s not uncommon to share information with others that is inappropriate and none of their business).
What about visibility? I don’t want to see women disappear and only operate/work behind the scenes. Nor does the great majority of the population want it either. My advice here is to access your vulnerability–where could potshots come from? Who could create them? What’s the worst thing that can happen? And if you feel that you are targeted, get help from someone(s) who is non-judgmental, trustworthy and has an understanding/expertise of whatever the situation is.

Will Martha Stewart sidestep visibility? Nope…all you had to see was her wave from the plane as she left prison. Sure, she was down. But, she’s not out. If you choose to delete yourself, so will others. It’s not a good thing.

Taking Stock … Being Visible the Rest of the Year

It’s time to take stock . . . summer is around the corner; the year is almost half over. Here’s a few ideas to stay connected (or start up) with friends, family, neighbors, workplace and business contacts.

1. Answer your phone. The common grumble I hear is that everyone hides behind voice mail, rarely returning calls. Stop it—have you ever stopped to think how much time you waste listening to repeated calls asking you to contact another? Instead of ignoring the call, return it and end the call back chain.

2. Make a few calls. Get out your PDA or twirl the Rolodex and commit to real phone contacts 15-20 minutes a day with a goal of reaching 5 people. Connecting in real time with real people opens doors, some that you had no idea existed. Send a post card with a quick note — I’ve still have post cards that Tom Peters sent me that are 20 plus years old. He’s a firm believer in staying connected after he meets and/or works with someone.

3. If you own your own company or head up a department, create a quarterly newsletter that is snail mailed and emailed. Ditto if you are in management. Ditto if you are just you. The point is to stay connected. There are plenty of software programs available that are easily formatted for newsletters. Sure, write about what’s new and exciting. But add info that is useful that may be related to your industry or just an interesting fact or item that you’ve come across. Make sure you ask them to have the email address that will be sending out the announcement of the newsletter (or the newsletter itself) in the recipient’s email address book — otherwise, you might be spammed out. Many of my clients know that I review movies for my newsletter — it’s not uncommon to get emails asking what I think about a current movie. Consider starting a blog.

4. Have a party. Organize a beginning of Summer or welcome to Fall party and invite all past clients, customers — everyone to join in. Enjoy the renewed contact in a format of fun and celebration . . . and, have everyone bring a food contribution for a local shelter or food pantry. Or, if there is a family in the news that has incurred some type of a disaster, adopt them for the day. Food, clothing, gifts, etc. are brought by all attending and delivered. Make it an annual event with a different theme every year to make it interesting, fun and enjoyable. It can be as simple as a picnic in the park or as fancy as a restaurant. If your home is large enough to handle the people flow, use that.

5. Do seasonal things — if you’ve got a budget to work with, how about renting an ice cream truck and give away ice cream on a hot, hot day. August has lots of them. Do sufficient marketing in advance to build the anticipation and participation in the event. Think about doing promotions like pumpkins in the fall, seedlings in the spring. Choose a theme, like improving the neighborhood or enhancing the park areas. Always promote the event in advance using both digital and direct mail marketing and send thank you notes to all who were involved after each event.

6. Sponsor a movie at your local theatre for kids on weekends. Buy a block of tickets for an upcoming kids show and give away free popcorn. Send the tickets out in advance and precede the event with newspaper and flyer marketing. Tap into a local radio show — they are pros are masters of movie ticket give-aways. Take full advantage of sending invitations, flyers, and emails and be sure to maximize the theatre marquee for drive by exposure. As a kid, I can remember this was a favorite on a Saturday.

7. Organize a block party for the end of summer in your work neighborhood, your own, or take it to another neighborhood that would welcome you and you are connected to. Do your homework on finding out what permits are necessary to ‘block’ off the street and arrange for entertainment. Most Cities now have written policies or what to do (and not what to do) that they will promptly mail to you. Head the committee to distribute and print the flyers and to organize the ‘bring a dish to pass’ list for the neighbors. Kids love face painting, temporary tattoos, balloons and goody bags. Contact a sponsor or local merchant to provide some free back to school pens pencils and crayons. Hit the Dollar Store to get prizes for games. Donate the soda, hot dogs or ice cream. Always include information about you and your services.

8. Start planning now to do a holiday drive for your local charity. Food drives, toys for tots, holiday food baskets or coats for the cold are always welcome. Local shelters have ‘wish lists.’ Find out what’s on it and pass the word. As an author, I’ve made a tradition of give boxes of books to women’s shelters during the Holidays — self-help, inspirational and how-to topics are always welcome.

Extending yourself and resources to your community is a good thing. You get great visibility in a value added manner and your efforts really help. It does take time and planning. If you’re not busy, you are not ‘out there’ reminding people that you are in the business to serve them, both as a person and as a professional.

9. Have a good time and do something that you are passionate about. I’ve vowed not to get on an airplane during the month of July! I want to stay home for an entire 31 days and work in the garden, read a few good books and do a full revision of my book, When God Says NO. What are you passionate about?

Getting Your Engines Started…

Personal Note from Judith
Thanks for all the cards and emails I’ve received this past month–the new knee is getting stronger. My last gig was in Las Vegas on December 14th; on the 15th, I got a new knee. Some folks look for front teeth for Christmas . . . I got a new knee–thanks Santa. I’m getting around on a cane quite well and definitely look forward to my first speech in Houston in February where I won’t be using crutches. Just call me bionic!

Judith’s Speaking Calendar 2005 – 2006
Judith’s speaking calendar is half-way sold out for 2005 and several dates have been committed to for 2006. Don’t miss out–call now to reserve your dates. Angie is in the office from 7.30 AM to 3.30 PM Mountain Time–800-594-0800.

Get Your Engines Started …
It’s post time for the Holidays, you’ve been to a ton of gatherings and parties in the past month. Your Rolodex is a mess and you’ve got a stack of new business cards that you can’t remember who they belong to and where you got them from.

Who’s in your network and is it time to spruce it up a tad? How do you go from a networking nobody to super schmoozer? You’ll get yourself to the “place” to be at, then what? What do you do to get your networking act together now?

Master PR rep Rick Frishman (President of Planned Television Arts-NY) has co-authored NETWORKING MAGIC: Find the Best – from Doctors, Lawyers, and Accountants to Homes, Schools, and Job (Adams Media, 2004) with Jill Lublin. They’ve created a laundry list of things to avoid in the networking maze. Included are:

Don’t act desperate
Don’t sell
Don’t monopolize
Don’t ask too soon for help
Don’t solicit competitors
Don’t show off or brag
Don’t offer to do something that you can’t or is a stretch
Don’t interrupt
Don’t just talk about you
Don’t pitch yourself
Don’t play it by ear
Don’t misrepresent yourself
Don’t promise what you can’t deliver
Don’t pry
Don’t linger with losers and “hangers-on”
Don’t scan the room for others; excuse yourself and move on
Don’t overextend
Don’t be discouraged
Don’t make requests until you know the person
Anytime, anyplace, anywhere is a good time to network. True networking is a form of giving. Sure, you receive on the networking side, but it’s the building of relationships over a period of time that creates the biggest present/payback.

With the “Don’ts” out of the way, what are some of the “Dos?” Here’s a few:
Two safe strategies start with a question and a compliment. Ask an open-ended question that might have a connection with the function you are attending. Most people love to talk about themselves, so ask what was their favorite gift they received during the Holidays or if they had a magic wand, what would be their ideal vacation spot.

If it’s work or a professional association, something along the line–What a year . . . what’s the biggest hurdle (or achievement) you or your group dealt with this year? That should create some response that can start a dialogue of substance–or at least show that you are a great listener. Or, simply compliment them–be it a tie, shoes, accessory or a snazzy outfit.

Keep notes. Networking involves excellent communication. Get your business cards out and exchange them . . . and immediately make a note on the back–the event, something that triggers an “aha” in your mind, something unique about your interaction.

When you reconnect, refer back to it–guaranteed, the other party will be grateful–he most likely have a few memory lapses between events as well.

Don’t spam via email or phone–connect when you have something that is genuine and will most likely be of interest.

Schedule follow-up time on your calendar–send a note or email–something that would be of interest to the recipient. Not a “checking in” but ““thought this would be of interest to you” note.

If you note an article or announcement–send your kudos . . . remember, most people like to be acknowledged and cheered on.

Join and get involved with groups and associations that you have an interest in. For starters, you’ve already got something in common.

Create an e-mail newsletter with tips or helpful information. Software is available to make such e-mails seem personal and not a group mailing.
Frishman says, “Networking should be a way of life. This applies to everybody–from folks who work in big corporations to college students to stay-at-home moms. It’s the building and maintaining of relationships, and relationships require caring, helping, kindness, decency, trust and honoring others. In a nutshell, networking is about giving and giving generously.”

Networking Gridlock
For some, networking is a piece of cake; for others it’s work. Some of the best networkers may be terrified when them plunge into a room full of strangers. Either way, if you are feeling on the tepid side, why not ask the host to introduce you to two or three people. It’s a start and Mom always said that a “little practice” each day makes perfect; it also means that you’ve got to commit some time to the process.

The networking bottom line: Don’t let relationships fade away until you need or want something. That’s not networking, it’s mooching. “Eighty percent
of networking is following up” according to Frishman. “The key is to give information, thanks, congratulations or sincere compliments with no expectation of getting something in return.”

Remember—networking isn’t about promoting yourself; it’s a tool that lays the foundation for future business and friendships—both take time to develop. Start now, it’s an ideal tool to begin the year with.

Through Changing… Then You’re Through

How’s your workplace life been — calm, serene, laid back, tranquil . . . or maybe, a tad hectic? If the latter, the change factor is most likely the creator. You and your career have a choice. Get on the change train, or get run over. You might say, “I’ll leave, get another job . . . or, start my own business.” Either way, you won’t avoid change.

Change — the number one issue in most organizations. It involves identifying what needs to be changed; what process should be used in going through the cycles of change; and what programs and trainings will employees need to participate in to embrace and grow with it.

Organizations come up with all kinds of names and descriptors–reorganization, realigning, repositioning, re _________ (fill in the blank)—whatever the “re” is, you have most likely encountered it throughout your career. If you browse any business section in a bookstore and you’ll discover that books on change and leadership are the bestsellers.

Without Change, You Stagnate
Change is a constant. It’s woven throughout your career and your personal life. When change is in the air, fear, resistance and denial are normal feelings. Change is often destructive; the sacred cows of your workplace can be threatened—those old habits and traditions that are adhere to, whether it is good for you or not. You end up carrying baggage that should be dumped.

Workplace naysayers issue warnings—slow down, management is going to fast, even stop. No matter what you do, some toes will be bruised. If you, and your organization, are unwilling to break a few things along the change path, heavy baggage accumulates. Bad habits and sacred cows remain intact. In the end, you sabotage may your future.

It takes courage to embrace change, to thrive with it. Without change, your creativity is stifled, your growth is stunted and great ideas and concepts will die. Will Rogers said, “Even if you’re on the right track, you’ll get run over if you just sit there.”

There are two major contributors to resisting change. First, management fails to clearly communicate the goals, the purpose, and the vision behind the change. And second, it fails to either get input from employees within the organization or asks for it, then totally ignores it.

Change rarely occurs overnight, there are critical steps in the process. Start with:

Understanding what the proposed change is. If unclear, ask for clarity. This is the single biggest reason most changes get sabotaged—it was never clearly communicated.

Whenever change is in play, clear communication is a must.
Use common words to convey new and uncommon ideas, things
and events. If you have a crossword vocabulary, this is not
the time to use it. Keep communications simple.

How big does it feel? Is that something minor, or does it feel or sound like a major restructuring based on your own experiences? Is it a “10” or is it a “2”?

Is the proposed change something that you see as a “match” for your beliefs and what the organization should be? If you won’t be comfortable, get out now—if the company is going to make widgets and you personally feel that they are destroying the environment, this is not a fit.

Ask—what factors can you control, influence and not control? Too often, people grumble and complain about things that they can give no input to—focus on what you can influence or control—skip things you can’t control, you are wasting your time and energy (and others).

What skills and strengths do you have now that can be used in through the change process? Do an assessment of your strengths and weaknesses. Communicate skills that are assets to your manager or supervisor and how they can be used during the course of the change.

Determine what skills you need to acquire. In the workplace today, anyone who is not savvy enough to do the basics on a computer or make use of the Internet is in trouble. Solution—hire any kid over eight. He or she will tap dance over the keyboard and open up a fabulous world in information. Or, you can enroll in a class. Either way, just do it.

How much time will be allowed to implement the change? You can have all the skills that will enhance the change in progress, but if you are clueless to a timeframe, you may miss the opportunity to use them.

What roadblocks could prevent you from succeeding? Are there sacred cows in the way? Is there anyone within the team withholding information that would enable the process to proceed and succeed? Could you be dragging your heels?

What’s the incentive for making the change? Always a good question—what’s in it for you?
Change is here for the rest of your life. Without it, nothing could exist, and life, as present generations currently know it, would cease to exist. Anyone over 30 knows when reflecting back to childhood that computers, VCR’s, DVDs, email and text messaging did not exist. Those under 30 just assume that they are as common as a cold.

There will always be risk and costs to change. There are more hazards and risks to your career and workplace when stagnation is allowed. Change, it happens.

Woman of Distinction – 2004
It was with great honor that Judith accepted the 2004 Woman of Distinction award in June from the Girl Scouts. Beginning with a beautiful reception on the 15th—several events are planned through the fall honoring all the fantastic recipients of this designation. What a great group to belong to. Being a Brownie and a Girl Scout from the ages of 7 to 11, it is always a pleasure to give back to so many.

Martha and the Female Factor

My, My, My . . . what a mess—the jury is back and proclaimed that Martha Stewart lied. She was convicted of obstructing an investigation relating to insider trading—a charge never levied at her. She (and her legal team) made lots of mistakes. Probably her first was even speaking to anyone from the government without fully understanding that she was a target coupled with the simple fact she started with the wrong attorney.

When someone, anyone, is attempting to portray another as a criminal, you need criminal representation—not corporate. It was downhill from there. You may think, “Why get a criminal attorney unless you have something to hide . . . or are a criminal?” The answer is quite simple—unless you really are a criminal, you will most likely not know what should be said and not said. Your representative is in the same boat.

Will Stewart appeal the verdict? Yes. Will she succeed in overturning the verdict? Most likely, no. Will she go to jail? Probably. Should she? No. Was she really presumed innocent until proven guilty? I don’t think so. I can’t help but wonder—did she truly have a jury of her peers? Just how many millions were spent to bring her down? Did she really lie? The jury said so. Should she have? No.

The Lying Game
Is lying common? Of course . . . it’s at all levels, including the government. Do I support it? Absolutely not. But is Ms. Martha alone? I don’t think so. When was the last time you were pulled over for speeding and you fudged and said you didn’t know how fast you were going? Is the height and weight correct on your driver’s license? How about some of the values on those charitable deductions claimed on your tax return? All are examples of lying to the government.

If the government decided to put any of us under a microscope that has a bottomless checkbook to support probing, I suspect that very few, if any, of us would pass squeaky clean. Lying is not a good thing. It goes on and anyone who feels that the government and that the judicial systems are 100 percent honest needs to come out of lala-land.

As an author, speaker and columnist on workplace issues, my email was bombarded from readers about Martha Stewart after the conviction. Some I’ve heard from in the past, others new voices. All were women. All said basically that the outcome stinks; that Martha was targeted because she was, well, Martha; that there are gender issues at play (many wrote that they like to see a list of men who’ve been prosecuted and jailed under the same circumstances); that it’s OK and assumed that men will be aggressive and cheered for been assertive and women—the Marthas, will be labeled as bitches, egomaniacs, arrogant and selfish. One emailer wrote, “I wish I had a dime for every lie from the Government—including our elected representatives . . . I’d be wealthy indeed.”

Interesting, Martha’s former testifying friend (I assume that she is a former at this point), Mariana Pasternak’s hubby Bart is a vascular surgeon. He just happened to own 100,000 thousands of shares of the ImClone stock that seeded Martha’s misadventures at the same time. He sold 10,000 shares within a day of Stewart selling hers and dumped the rest a few weeks later. Did the Feds visit him about “insider trading”? Did he lie as to why he sold them if asked?

One juror felt Stewart was the poster CEO for all corporate scandal and the Slaying of Martha was an overdue victory for the little guy. I wonder if Kenneth Lay (Enron), Bernie Ebbers (WorldCom) and Joe Naccio (Qwest) are sleeping better these days knowing that Martha’s conviction may just take some of the sting out of the incredible depth of their dishonesty, mismanagement and corporate misbehavior? These men lost vast amounts of money, cheated creditors, wiped out employees’ pensions, devastated communities, and caused thousands of men and women to lose their jobs and to lose their life savings. Stewart being the poster CEO for corporate scandal . . . please.

The Visibility Factor
Can high visibility be a handicap to one’s career? Since the mid-eighties, my research has shown that the more visible you are and the more successful you are, or perceived to be, the more often people will try to take you down. The thousands of women and men that I’ve interviewed over the years on the topics of sabotage in the workplace, failure, success and rebuilding confidence have expressed as much.

Failure is also a bigger handicap for women than for men. Men often view failure as a fact of life . . . get up and get going again. Women often view it as being tainted for the rest of your life, cooties, and want to withdraw (Woman to Woman 2000, New Horizon Press).

Does that mean that if you are successful, others will target you . . . by prosecutors if it could be politically smart for them to do so? Maybe. Readers have shared that that is exactly what they endured along their career paths. As women, successful and visible women, there were plenty non-supporters tossing roadblocks their way.

Are there different rules for women than there are for men when it comes to success, visibility, even celebrity? I think so. All the women who responded to previous columns on this topic felt there are. For women, high visibility can be a handicap. Expect pot shots and innuendos hurled in your direction.

What’s the lesson? —see the first paragraph—and if you are a Big Shot, if anyone shows up from the government, keep your mouth shut until you know and understand what “it” is all about. We all know that Martha is a tough cookie—one who wears an apron. She made lots of mistakes, and yes, she shouldn’t have lied. But being treated as a criminal? I don’t think so.

A Toast to You…

This past year has been one of challenges for many of my friends, clients, family members and self. Ranging from bad news about health, to fears about loved ones overseas, and to business challenges, many have been on a roller coaster.  Truly, this has been a year or turbulence.  One of my friends sends a traditional toast each year.  I pass it along with wishes for good health, prosperity, joy and peace to you. 

May your worst day of your future 
be better than the best of your past.
 

Survival and Success 
. . . The Formula for 2004

I confess, I’m like millions of television viewers: I watch “Survivor”.  It’s a great place to watch a microcosm of relationships and deception at work.  As a professional speaker on dealing with the BS in the workplace that involves conflict and sabotage among the players (be they staff or management), this is an excellent resource that many in my audiences can relate.   

So how did the final three—Rotten Jon, Boy Scout Leader Lill and Confronting and Fish-Kicking Sandra fit in the survival-and-success formula? Are they representative of the workplace—your workplace? 

Instead of bluntly telling a “Bert” or “Bertha” at the first pass that lying to his or her coworkers to avoid finishing a project could be a ticket to the unemployment line, all I need to do is weave in the example of Rotten Jon faking the death of his beloved Grandmother to get sympathy from his island mates.   

The reality is that there’s often someone suspicious of another’s actions.  If it’s a lie and it leaks that it is, those who have to deal with him, will nail him at the first chance.  Sandra never trusted Jon, although she had to team with him a few times—her suspicion radar was very high.  

To his credit, he said the game was about lying, cheating and scheming and he would do his best to be the best at it.  Of all the Survivor shows, Jon is the best weasel that has surfaced to date.   In the workplace, if you have a rat, it’s better to know who it is. 

Boy Scout Leader Lill violated the ‘ole “walk your talk,” negating the image she put out.  It didn’t jive with what her fellow Survivors experienced.  It was unfortunate that Lill had to jump ship wearing the Boy Scout uniform; I had empathy with her for wearing the wrong thing at the wrong place.  But, when she showed up with it again for the final vote, my “it’s too bad she got stuck with those clothes” rationale disappeared.   

Boy Scouts aren’t supposed to lie, whine and manipulate others. Any veteran viewer knew that part of the game is lying, whining and manipulating.  Behaviors that violate the visual or verbal projected image will sour the workplace.  

As “Survivor: Pearl Islands” unfolded and I got to know a bit about each of the players, it wasn’t difficult to see scenarios for the series.  Survivor Sandra Diaz-Twine, an office worker for the Army and Air Force Exchange Service, walked away (or maybe scratched away after all those bug bites) with the top prize, and I wasn’t surprised.  

You see, Sandra understands sabotage and conflict—how to stay in the background when necessary and kick a few fish around when appropriate.  When she kicked the bucket of fish like a little kid that didn’t get her way, the evening’s menu disappeared.  She let her pal Christa take the fall, claiming to the viewing audience that it was an accident. Hmm, maybe not.  Winner Sandra was a master of manipulation but far more covertly delivered than what the overt Jon did. 

There was also interesting gender plays—men (Jon and Burton) denigrated the women, didn’t claiming that they couldn’t come up with a strategy if they had to.  The guys’ fatal mistake was leaving the women alone and a new alliance sprang up—women against men or us vs. them.  How primitive, how effective—adios Burton and Jon. 

Believe it or not, these players were able to put into play and practiced the key components of Bob Burg’s nifty booklet, The Success Formula (www.thesuccessformula.com).  Burg’s formula is based on three principles— 

  1. Seek out and find information

  2. Apply the information immediately

  3. Be persistent 

Each one of the Survivors had to gather info on their competitors—what were their strengths? Weaknesses?

Each had to use the information—some did it as soon as a discovery was made and some of it was stored for later use. 

Each had to be persistent in the goal, be it set this person up for the fall today or create an alliance with him.  The reward and goal was $1,000,000. 

The workplace is the ideal place to practice Burg’s formula.  I’m not suggesting using it to set someone up.  No, let’s be proactive here and use it to get and do better at what you presently do.  I don’t care how great everyone says the economy is—it’s tough out there.  To paraphrase Burg’s formula, here’s my two-bits for a thriving 2004: 

  1. To compete and survive in your career, you must continue to seek out and find information that applies to what you do and what changes your environment and industry are experiencing;

  2. You’ve got to apply the information immediately—it’s a very competitive (and sometimes ugly) world out there, if you position yourself to merely react to whatever comes your way, you are going to be steamrolled with the rate of change that is common today; and

  3. Be focused, myopic in your quest and persistent . . . it’s your time to be the little engine that could.  Every successful person, be they athletic, business person or a star has failed.  But they get up, they come to bat, they show up—again and again.

There are lots of traits and qualities of the Survival gang that you don’t want to incorporate.  But the three mentioned above were all key factors in their success.  What are your factors?  How can you incorporate them into your game plan for 2004?

ATTN: All Health Care Professionals!

The Judith Briles Health Care Management -Leadership Forum is getting great reviews! We had our first Forum last March and received rave reviews—an intensive two-days that created a variety of new tools, skills and techniques for Forum participants.  Participation in the Forum is limited to 16 per 2-day session.  Beginning at 8:30 in the morning, it ends at 5:30 each day. Tuition includes all Forum supplies and day meals. Each Forum has added new elements and item—it’s the perfect platform for new managers.

What is the Forum?

The Judith Briles Health Care Management-Leadership Forum is designed exclusively for the frontline manager of five years or less experience in the health care workplace. Too often, people are promoted with minimal, if any, training in “How to be a Manager.” Even less is offered in “How to be a Leader.” They are not the same! The Forum delivers an intensive lab/training that focuses on developing the soft people skills that just don’t come naturally.  Most people don’t leave their workplace for another position because of more money . . . they leave because of abusive managers.  Is your organization breeding them?

Participants will learn: Effective Use of Influence and Power; Effective Leadership; Managing Staff Expectations; Managing Multi-Generational Staff; Managing Diversity; Identifying and Eliminating Red Ink Behavior; Identifying and Dealing with Marginal Employees; Team-Building; Prioritizing; Motivation; Building Staff Loyalty; Documenting and Carefronting® Problem Employees; Managing Conflict; Effective Communicating; Proactive Listening; Peer Mentoring; Peer Networking; eMentoring; eCoaching; Transitioning to Management and much more.

Based on the phenomenal research detailed in my book, “Zapping Conflict in the Health Care Workplace”, as well as several of my other books, the Forum delivers results that can be implemented immediately upon the attendee’s return to the workplace! And the coaching doesn’t stop when the session is over — participation in the Forum includes continued access to Judith’s coaching and mentoring skills through a special website, email, and phone number. Ever wish you could remember what the trainer said to do in a certain situation? Now you can — Judith will continue to be there even after you’ve returned to your workplace!

More Info . . .

All sessions are held in Judith’s offices in Aurora CO.  When weather permits, they are outside, surrounded by beautiful gardens, ponds and charming fountains.  Dress is casual and comfortable and food excellent.  All it needs is you.  Future dates include:

2004

  • March 18-19
  • May 27-28
  • July 22-23
  • September 23-24

For those of you who would like to take advantage of this program by traveling to our corporate office in the Metro Denver area, we have made special arrangements with the Radisson Hotel Denver Southeast to provide not only lodging and complimentary breakfast in a full-service hotel with views of Cherry Creek Lake, but also transportation to/from Denver International Airport, and to/from The Forum site – all for $89 per night!

To take advantage of this exclusive program and special rates when more than three individuals attend from one organization, call Angie Pacheco at 303-627-9179 or 800-594-0800 now! 

Etc., Etc., Etc.

Speaking . . .
Call Angie Pacheco in our offices to check on availability and fees for your group. We are booking our 2004-2005 calendar now. With the recent publication of “Zapping Conflict in the Health Care Workplace” (already a second, revised and expanded edition is available); groups who book this talk get a special discount.  Call Angie to find out more.

Consulting . . .
After constant requests, I’ve allocated a few hours each day for consulting. By the hour or the project, you can schedule an intensive brainstorming session with me. Each year, we commit to up to three health care systems to do a combination of on and off-site training, coaching and mentoring. This year, we’ve added publishing to the list of offerings—as in everything you need to know, and you didn’t know you needed to know. To check available times or if you group qualifies, either call at 800-594-0800 or email me.

Movie Reviews . . .
If you like the movies, make sure you sign up for JB’s Movie Spots-they’re quick, snappy and let you know if a Gramma would be comfortable. Rating scale is the Golden Egg-one’s a dud, five, drop everything and get ye to the theater!

The Foreign Press . . .

This past year, several of Judith’s books have been translated into nine languages—China, Thailand, Korea, Saudi Arabia, Indonesia, India, Lebanon, France, and Brazil.

News to Share . . .
www.FindCE.com is a new site acting as a continuing education portal that should be good news to many of our clients. It caters to three entities: Health professionals, meeting planners and speakers, all of whom register themselves with the site. Professionals benefit by having free access to exhaustive information about meetings and speakers, including report cards. Meeting planners benefit by marketing their events to professionals and having more than 1,000 registered speakers to search through when planning their next event. Speakers market themselves to meeting planners without paying a commission to a bureau. In addition, home-study courses, online CE sites, audiovisual materials and other CE outlets are displayed.  Check it out.

If you are a health care professional, than this is the book for you . . .
Zapping Conflict in the Health Care Workplace is available—all 420 pages of it!
 A bestseller with the Nurse’s Book Club this past fall, it’s the must have for any health care professional.  If you work in healthcare or know someone working in health care, this is the perfect book for dealing with conflict and change that is woven throughout the industry. Over 3000 women and men responded to our Conflict and Workplace Abuse surveys-lots of surprises! Available at Amazon.com, Borders.com and Barnes & Noble.com or by calling the Tattered Cover at 800-833-9327. Price is $35. 

Speaking of Zapping Conflict in the Health Care Workplace… The Reviews Are In!
Here’s what’s being said about “Zapping Conflict in the Health Care Workplace” by Dr. Judith Briles:

From the Midwest Book Review:

”Zapping Conflict in the Health Care Workplace” by author, consultant, research, spokesperson and international speaker Judith Briles is an exhaustively researched, accessibly written, informationally practical guide for workers and employers on a spectrum of health care issues focused upon the importance of preserving a well-regulated workplace when people’s lives are at stake every day. Individual chapters instructionally address positive means for handling conflict between employees, the straight scoop on workplace sabotage and how to deal with it, advice on generational differences, and much, much more. Highly recommended for non-specialist general readers with an interest in health care workplace issues, policies, and concerns, as well as offering specifically useable advice for workplaces beyond the field of health care, Zapping Conflict In The Health Care Workplace is a welcome and invaluable addition to personal, professional, corporate, and community library Health & Medicine reference collections.

From The Director of NADONA/LTC:

This outstanding publication is a MUST for every nurse working in long term care, including the director of nursing! By the year 2005, an estimated 11.5 million women and men in the United States will work in the health care industry. Shortages exist in nursing and dental hygienists and assistance. Conflict and sabotage in the “caring” environment of health care is increasing. Instead of actively finding ways and methods to resolve conflict, managers and staff totally disagree on WHY conflict is increasing and on HOW to reduce it. Therefore, they avoid it. Dr. Briles shows why women must eradicate traditional and harmful learned behaviors, why organizations must rebuild their educational offerings to include both clinical and professional development offerings and managers and staff must learn constructive and effective ways to deal with conflict and sabotage when it surfaces.

Caring for the Caregiver

As this summer winds down, my thoughts continually turn to someone I miss dearly. Last summer, my beloved Heart Mom died.  Joyce wasn’t my birth Mother, she was someone who took me under her wing and was my role model from the time I was 12.  She was the primary caregiver for several years after husband Bill was diagnosed with Alzheimer’s.   

Not wanting others to know that he had it, or how much home life was deteriorating, she bore the great burden of his care.  She avoided any discussion about his condition, often making excuses for it.  Family members begged her to get help.  I distinctly remember a phone call with her when I told her that I feared that the stress would take her before it ever did him.  A year before her death, she finally got some help when he turned violent and the situation couldn’t be ignored.  Bill was placed in a facility specializing in Alzheimer’s.  I’m afraid it was too, too late.  Her heart gave out not long after. 

Do you know a caregiver? My guess is that most of you do, or have known someone in this position. You know them by the circles under their eyes, and the sense of isolation and foreboding floating around them as the cloak of hopelessness covers their broad shoulders.  It’s common for them to deny, as Joyce did, that things are tough and sometimes overwhelming. 

Chances are, all of us in our lifetimes will experience either being the caregiver or being the cared for, even if for a short while.  Don’t put off having “the” family discussion so that the responsibility of care giving doesn’t fall on one family member. Also—

  • Build your support network—someone to “care for the caregiver”
  • Have a confidant that you can talk to about the stress of care giving.
  • Create a care-giving plan so you can better manage your time, the paid Caregiver’s time and the needs and desires of the individual who needs the care.
  • Do some exploring—if you work for pay, are there other career options that are less stressful?
  • Could you start a small business or do your work out of your home?
  • Few like to dive in a deal with the “what ifs” . . . but let’s look in the mirror, your “what if” could be here tomorrow.  Remember to take care of you. 

#  #  #

Changes at The Briles Group, Inc! 


I’m pleased to announce that Angie Pacheco has joined me as my Marketing and Sales Director beginning September 19th.  I’ve had the pleasure of working with Angie on other projects for the past 7 years.  She will be in the office from 
7.30 AM to 4.00 PM Mountain time Monday through Friday.  Her phone is 800-594-0800.  We both look forward to bringing terrific programs to your facilities and community. 

ATTN: All Health Care Professionals!


The Judith Briles Health Care Management -Leadership Forum is getting great reviews!
  

We had our first Forum last March and received rave reviews—an intensive two-days that created a variety of new tools, skills and techniques for Forum participants.
  Participation in the Forum is limited to 16 per 2-day session.  Beginning at 8:30 in the morning, it ends at 5:30 each day. Tuition includes all Forum supplies and day meals. Each Forum has added new elements and item—it’s the perfect platform for new managers.

What is the Forum?

The Judith Briles Health Care Management-Leadership Forum is designed exclusively for the frontline manager of five years or less experience in the health care workplace. Too often, people are promoted with minimal, if any, training in “How to be a Manager.” Even less is offered in “How to be a Leader.” They are not the same! The Forum delivers an intensive lab/training that focuses on developing the soft people skills that just don’t come naturally.  Most people don’t leave their workplace for another position because of more money . . . they leave because of abusive managers.  Is your organization breeding them?

Participants will learn: Effective Use of Influence and Power; Effective Leadership; Managing Staff Expectations; Managing Multi-Generational Staff; Managing Diversity; Identifying and Eliminating Red Ink Behavior; Identifying and Dealing with Marginal Employees; Team-Building; Prioritizing; Motivation; Building Staff Loyalty; Documenting and Carefronting® Problem Employees; Managing Conflict; Effective Communicating; Proactive Listening; Peer Mentoring; Peer Networking; eMentoring; eCoaching; Transitioning to Management and much more.

Based on the phenomenal research detailed in my book, Zapping Conflict in the Health Care Workplace, as well as several of my other books, the Forum delivers results that can be implemented immediately upon the attendee’s return to the workplace! And the coaching doesn’t stop when the session is over — participation in the Forum includes continued access to Judith’s coaching and mentoring skills through a special website, email, and phone number. Ever wish you could remember what the trainer said to do in a certain situation? Now you can — Judith will continue to be there even after you’ve returned to your workplace!

More Info . . .

All sessions are held in Judith’s offices in Aurora CO.  When weather permits, they are outside, surrounded by beautiful gardens, ponds and charming fountains.  Dress is casual and comfortable and food excellent.  All it needs is you.  Future dates include:

2003

  • August 21-22
  • November 6-7
2004

  • January 22-23
  • March 18-19
  • May 27-28
  • July 22-23
  • September 23-24

For those of you who would like to take advantage of this program by traveling to our corporate office in the Metro Denver area, we have made special arrangements with the Radisson Hotel Denver Southeast to provide not only lodging and complimentary breakfast in a full-service hotel with views of Cherry Creek Lake, but also transportation to/from Denver International Airport, and to/from The Forum site – all for $89 per night!

To take advantage of this exclusive program and special rates when more than three individuals attend from one organization, call Angie Pacheco at 303-627-9179 or 800-594-0800 now! The November session is slated for the 6th and 7th—there are five spotsopen as I write this.  

News to Share . . .
FindCE.com is a new site acting as a continuing education portal that should be good news to many of our clients. It caters to three entities: Health professionals, meeting planners and speakers, all of whom register themselves with the site. Professionals benefit by having free access to exhaustive information about meetings and speakers, including report cards. Meeting planners benefit by marketing their events to professionals and having more than 1,000 registered speakers to search through when planning their next event. Speakers market themselves to meeting planners without paying a commission to a bureau. In addition, home-study courses, online CE sites, audiovisual materials and other CE outlets are displayed.  Check it out.


Etc., Etc., Etc.
If you are a health care professional, than this is the book for you . . .

 
Zapping Conflict in the Health Care Workplace is available—all 420 pages of it!
 A bestseller with the Nurse’s Book Club this year, it’s the must have for any health care professional.  If you work in healthcare or know someone working in health care, this is the perfect book for dealing with conflict and change that is woven throughout the industry. Over 3000 women and men responded to our Conflict and Workplace Abuse surveys-lots of surprises! Available at Amazon.com, Borders.com and Barnes & Noble.com or by calling the Tattered Cover at 800-833-9327. Price is $35. 


Speaking of Zapping Conflict in the Health Care Workplace… The Reviews Are In!
Here’s what’s being said about “Zapping Conflict in the Health Care Workplace” by Dr. Judith Briles:

From the Midwest Book Review:

Zapping Conflict in the Health Care Workplace by author, consultant, research, spokesperson and international speaker Judith Briles is an exhaustively researched, accessibly written, informationally practical guide for workers and employers on a spectrum of health care issues focused upon the importance of preserving a well-regulated workplace when people’s lives are at stake every day. Individual chapters instructionally address positive means for handling conflict between employees, the straight scoop on workplace sabotage and how to deal with it, advice on generational differences, and much, much more. Highly recommended for non-specialist general readers with an interest in health care workplace issues, policies, and concerns, as well as offering specifically useable advice for workplaces beyond the field of health care, Zapping Conflict In The Health Care Workplace is a welcome and invaluable addition to personal, professional, corporate, and community library Health & Medicine reference collections.

From The Director (NADONA/LTC):

This outstanding publication is a MUST for every nurse working in long term care, including the director of nursing! By the year 2005, an estimated 11.5 million women and men in the United States will work in the health care industry. Shortages exist in nursing and dental hygienists and assistance. Conflict and sabotage in the “caring” environment of health care is increasing. Instead of actively finding ways and methods to resolve conflict, managers and staff totally disagree on WHY conflict is increasing and on HOW to reduce it. Therefore, they avoid it. Dr. Briles shows why women must eradicate traditional and harmful learned behaviors, why organizations must rebuild their educational offerings to include both clinical and professional development offerings and managers and staff must learn constructive and effective ways to deal with conflict and sabotage when it surfaces.

Speaking . . .
Call Angie Pacheco in our offices to check on availability and fees for your group. We are booking our 2004 calendar now.

Consulting . . .
After constant requests, I’ve allocated a few hours each day for consulting. By the hour or the project, you can schedule an intensive brainstorming session with me. each year, we commit to up to three health care systems to do a combination of on and off-site training, coaching and mentoring. To check available times or if you group qualifies, either call at 800-594-0800 or email me. 

Movie Reviews . . .
If you like the movies, make sure you sign up for JB’s Movie Spots-they’re quick, snappy and let you know if a Gramma would be comfortable. Rating scale is the Golden Egg-one’s a dud, five, drop everything and get ye to the theater! 

Can You Be Too Successful?

I write a monthly column for the Denver Business Journal.  In June, I focused on Martha Stewart and her recent indictment for obstructing justice and not for the anticipated and hyped probability that she would be charged with insider trading—she wasn’t. You can read the full column at

http://www.bizjournals.com/denver/stories/2003/06/16/smallb5.html

Prior to writing the column, I had viewed the Cybil Shepperd portrayal of Martha that was aired the previous month on national TV.  Apparently Martha watched it too, because she sent Cybil a gift basket with a hand-written note (would you expect anything less from Ms. Stewart?) congratulating Cybil and a “ps” that she doesn’t whine, complain, shriek the way it was portrayed on the program!

Apparently others were moved to respond—my phone calls and email around the article were overwhelming.  Only one writer didn’t agree with what I wrote—he felt that I should have focused more on the issue of her lying and the moral ramifications of it.  What I told him in my response was that I didn’t know if she was lying or telling the truth—only time will tell.

Outside of her driving, tough cookie persona, what I focused on was the fact that she just may have been too successful, too visible, too outspoken, and too perfect.  And that ticks people off, and can set one up for the big fall.  Now, did Martha screw up?  Yes.  She should have in the very beginning said that she didn’t feel that she did anything wrong, but that she would donate all the money from the stock sale to some cause.  It would have been the end of the story.

Did she lie about why she sold the ImClone stock?  I don’t know—but that’s what the Feds are after in the obstruction of justice charge.  Claiming her “lie” caused the stock of her company to decline, the Feds in turn claim that it caused financial loss to shareholders and that’s a no-no.  I’m still waiting to hear about the Feds moving in on Kenneth Lay of Enron and some of his pals.  Seems to me that those shareholders were wiped out with a few of his lies that have been proven! 

My women responders all said bravo, many adding stories of how they had been set up to some degree in their work lives—of which, they believed that much of the agony and harassment they went through was directly related to their success at the time.  None of it was a pretty picture. Until women are treated the same as men, I’m siding with Martha. I ended my column with sharing that I had ordered a “Save Martha” hat.  It fits.

ATTN: All Health Care Professionals!


The Judith Briles Health Care Management -Leadership Forum is up and running!!!
  

We had our first Forum in March and received rave reviews—an intensive two-days that created a variety of new tools, skills and techniques for Forum participants.
 Participation in the Forum is limited to 16 per 2-day session.  Beginning at 8:30 in the morning, it ends at 5:30 each day. Tuition includes all Forum supplies and day meals.

What is the Forum?

The Judith Briles Health Care Management-Leadership Forum is designed exclusively for the frontline manager of five years or less experience in the health care workplace. Too often, people are promoted with minimal, if any, training in “How to be a Manager.” Even less is offered in “How to be a Leader.” They are not the same! The Forum delivers an intensive lab/training that focuses on developing the soft people skills that just don’t come naturally.  Most people don’t leave their workplace for another position because of more money . . . they leave because of abusive managers.  Is your organization breeding them?

Participants will learn: Effective Use of Influence and Power; Effective Leadership; Managing Staff Expectations; Managing Multi-Generational Staff; Managing Diversity; Identifying and Eliminating Red Ink Behavior; Identifying and Dealing with Marginal Employees; Team-Building; Prioritizing; Motivation; Building Staff Loyalty; Documenting and Carefronting® Problem Employees; Managing Conflict; Effective Communicating; Proactive Listening; Peer Mentoring; Peer Networking; eMentoring; eCoaching; Transitioning to Management an much more.

Based on the phenomenal research detailed in my book, Zapping Conflict in the Health Care Workplace, as well as several of my other books, the Forum delivers results that can be implemented immediately upon the attendee’s return to the workplace! And the coaching doesn’t stop when the session is over — participation in the Forum includes continued access to Judith’s coaching and mentoring skills through a special website, email, and phone number. Ever wish you could remember what the trainer said to do in a certain situation? Now you can — Judith will continue to be there even after you’ve returned to your workplace!

More Info . . .

All sessions are held in Judith’s offices in Aurora CO.  When weather permits, they are outside, surrounded by beautiful gardens, ponds and charming fountains.  Dress is casual and comfortable and food excellent.  All it needs is you.  Future dates include:

2004 

  • January 22-23
  • March 18-19
  • May 27-28
  • July 22-23
  • September 23-24

For those of you who would like to take advantage of this program by traveling to our corporate office in the Metro Denver area, we have made special arrangements with the Radisson Hotel Denver Southeast to provide not only lodging and complimentary breakfast in a full-service hotel with views of Cherry Creek Lake, but also transportation to/from Denver International Airport, and to/from The Forum site – all for $89 per night!

To take advantage of this exclusive program and special rates when more than three individuals attend from one organization, call our office at 303-627-9179 or 800-594-0800 now! The August session is slated for the 21st and 22nd—there are five spotsopen as I write this.  

Etc., Etc., Etc.

Stop Stabbing Yourself in the Back walks away with being honored as the #3 in the How-To category from the Colorado Independent Publishers Association.  Described as the CliffsNotes for Self-Help, it is 21 chapters long, with each chapter a mini-book.  So, instead of a buying a whole book for dealing with change, or procrastination, or confrontation, or confidence, etc., you get it in nuggets all in one book—just the core info in each chapter—this is a perfect addition to your personal and professional bookshelf.  

Judith’s Books Journey to Foreign Lands . . .

This past year, four of Judith’s books (The Confidence Factor, Smart Money Moves for Kids, Stop Stabbing Yourself in the Back and When God says NO) have been translated in seven languages.  Editions are being birthed in China, Taiwan, Korea, Indonesia, India, France and Lebanon.

Latest Book for Health Care Professionals . . .

Zapping Conflict in the Health Care Workplace is available—all 400 pages of it!Selected as the Nurse’s Society Book Club feature the summer of 2003, it’s the must have for any health care professional.  If you work in healthcare or know someone working in health care, this is the perfect book for dealing with conflict and change that is woven throughout the industry. Over 3000 women and men responded to our Conflict and Workplace Abuse surveys-lots of surprises! Available at Amazon.com, Borders.com and Barnes & Noble.com or by calling the Tattered Cover at 800-833-9327. 

Speaking of Zapping Conflict in the Health Care Workplace… The Reviews Are In!
Here’s what’s being said about “Zapping Conflict in the Health Care Workplace” by Dr. Judith Briles:

From the Midwest Book Review:

Zapping Conflict in the Health Care Workplace by author, consultant, research, spokesperson and international speaker Judith Briles is an exhaustively researched, accessibly written, informationally practical guide for workers and employers on a spectrum of health care issues focused upon the importance of preserving a well-regulated workplace when people’s lives are at stake every day. Individual chapters instructionally address positive means for handling conflict between employees, the straight scoop on workplace sabotage and how to deal with it, advice on generational differences, and much, much more. Highly recommended for non-specialist general readers with an interest in health care workplace issues, policies, and concerns, as well as offering specifically useable advice for workplaces beyond the field of health care, Zapping Conflict In The Health Care Workplace is a welcome and invaluable addition to personal, professional, corporate, and community library Health & Medicine reference collections.

From The Director (NADONA/LTC):

This outstanding publication is a MUST for every nurse working in long term care, including the director of nursing! By the year 2005, an estimated 11.5 million women and men in the United States will work in the health care industry. Shortages exist in nursing and dental hygienists and assistance. Conflict and sabotage in the “caring” environment of health care is increasing. Instead of actively finding ways and methods to resolve conflict, managers and staff totally disagree on WHY conflict is increasing and on HOW to reduce it. Therefore, they avoid it. Dr. Briles shows why women must eradicate traditional and harmful learned behaviors, why organizations must rebuild their educational offerings to include both clinical and professional development offerings and managers and staff must learn constructive and effective ways to deal with conflict and sabotage when it surfaces.

Speaking . . .
Call our office to check on availability and fees for your group. A few dates are still available for 2003 and several have been booked for 2004-2005.

Consulting . . .
After constant requests, I’ve allocated a few hours each day for consulting. By the hour or the project, you can schedule an intensive brainstorming session with me. each year, we commit to up to three health care systems to do a combination of on and off-site training, coaching and mentoring. To check available times or if you group qualifies, either call at 800-594-0800 or email me.

Movie Reviews . . .
If you like the movies, make sure you sign up for JB’s Movie Spots-they’re quick, snappy and let you know if a Gramma would be comfortable. Rating scale is the Golden Egg-one’s a dud, five, drop everything and get ye to the theater!

Where We Are…

There’s no question that the workplace euphoria of a few years ago has been replaced with workplace scarcity-employees ask, “Will I be next . . . or will I be able to get a job?” Prior to 9/11 and the Iraqi War, Generation Xers and the Millennials had been sheltered from high levels of adversity and conflict. They went to school, graduated and got attractive job offers. Life was good, very good.

Then the economy shifted. Today, they go to school, graduate and don’t get the lucrative job offers envisioned. Work life is not so good. The recent hiring of Chelsea Clinton by the consulting firm of McKinsey & Co. at a six-figure salary would have been the norm pre-2000. Granted, she’s a graduate of Stanford University and Oxford . . . but can you see this young woman coming into your company as a consultant . . . with real, practical experience? Most likely not. The former first daughter’s most valuable asset is her pedigree.

As Spring reared its head in my home base of Denver Colorado, the snow bears roared . . . my back deck had eight feet of snow. It took a week to move it all, with no mail or papers for most of it. The TV relayed War news nonstop, the stock market continued its roller coaster ride and the economy at home isn’t so hot.

Times are tough for many. If you are a manager or leader, you must lead with confidence and keep communication channels open. If you don’t, your workplace can easily become a war zone. Snipers and saboteurs are lurking, ready to be cloned. Messages should be delivered with style and positive energy, acknowledging the phase the company is in. If times are bad and pink slips likely, employees don’t feel blind-sided. Remember, good times or bad-you lead, follow or get out of the way. Leading should be your choice.

If you are an employee, you work and keep your communication channels open. If you don’t, your workplace can also turn into a war zone. Your interaction and queries to both co-workers and managers should be delivered with positive energy, seeking whatever info and input you need. The last thing that you want is to be blind-sided.

ATTN: All Health Care Professionals! 
The Judith Briles Health Care Leadership Forum is up and running!!!  

A limited number of seats are available at the unbelievable price of $400 per person for the 3-day session, April 2-4 ONLY… Tuition in includes all Forum supplies and day meals. For those of you who would like to take advantage of this program by traveling to our corporate office in the Metro Denver area, we have made special arrangements with the Radisson Hotel Denver Southeast to provide not only lodging and complimentary breakfast in a full-service hotel with views of Cherry Creek Lake, but also transportation to/from Denver International Airport, and to/from The Forum site – all for $89 per night! To take advantage of this one-time-only offer of 4-for-the-price-of one, call our office at 303-627-9179 or 800-594-0800 now! The next session will be June 19-20.

What is the Forum?

The Judith Briles Health Care Leadership Forum is designed exclusively for the frontline manager of three years or less experience in the health care workplace. Too often, nurses are promoted with minimal, if any training in “How to be a Manager.” Even less is offered in “How to be a Leader.” They are not the same! The Forum delivers an intensive training that focuses on developing the soft people skills that just don’t come naturally.

Participants will learn: Effective Use of Influence and Power; Effective Leadership; Managing Staff Expectations; Managing Multi-Generational Staff; Managing Diversity; Managing within a Union Environment; Team-Building; Prioritizing; Motivation; Building Staff Loyalty; Documenting and Carefronting® Problem employees; Managing Conflict; Effective Communicating; Proactive Listening; Facilitating Groups; Managing Meetings; Peer Mentoring; Peer Networking; eMentoring; eCoaching; Transitioning to Management.

Based on the phenomenal research detailed in Judith’s book, Zapping Conflict in the Health Care Workplace, the forum delivers results that can be implemented immediately upon the attendee’s return to the workplace! And the coaching doesn’t stop when the session is over — participation in the Forum includes continued access to Judith’s coaching and mentoring skills through a special website, email, and phone number. Ever wish you could remember what the trainer said to do in a certain situation? Now you can — Judith will continue to be there even after you’ve returned to your workplace!

Etc., Etc., Etc.
Latest Book for Healthcare . . .
Zapping Conflict in the Health Care Workplace is available—all 400 pages of it!
 If you work in healthcare or know someone working in health care, this is the perfect book for dealing with conflict and change that is woven throughout the industry. Over 3000 women and men responded to our Conflict and Workplace Abuse surveys-lots of surprises! Available at Amazon.com, Borders.com and Barnes & Noble.com or by calling the Tattered Cover at 800-833-9327. A sample free chapter is posted on our site.

Speaking of Zapping Conflict in the Health Care Workplace… The Reviews Are In!
Here’s what’s being said about “Zapping Conflict in the Health Care Workplace” by Dr. Judith Briles:

From the Midwest Book Review:

Zapping Conflict in the Health Care Workplace by author, consultant, research, spokesperson and international speaker Judith Briles is an exhaustively researched, accessibly written, informationally practical guide for workers and employers on a spectrum of health care issues focused upon the importance of preserving a well-regulated workplace when people’s lives are at stake every day. Individual chapters instructionally address positive means for handling conflict between employees, the straight scoop on workplace sabotage and how to deal with it, advice on generational differences, and much, much more. Highly recommended for non-specialist general readers with an interest in health care workplace issues, policies, and concerns, as well as offering specifically useable advice for workplaces beyond the field of health care, Zapping Conflict In The Health Care Workplace is a welcome and invaluable addition to personal, professional, corporate, and community library Health & Medicine reference collections.

From The Director (NADONA/LTC):

This outstanding publication is a MUST for every nurse working in long term care, including the director of nursing! By the year 2005, an estimated 11.5 million women and men in the United States will work in the health care industry. Shortages exist in nursing and dental hygienists and assistance. Conflict and sabotage in the “caring” environment of health care is increasing. Instead of actively finding ways and methods to resolve conflict, managers and staff totally disagree on WHY conflict is increasing and on HOW to reduce it. Therefore, they avoid it. Dr. Briles shows why women must eradicate traditional and harmful learned behaviors, why organizations must rebuild their educational offerings to include both clinical and professional development offerings and managers and staff must learn constructive and effective ways to deal with conflict and sabotage when it surfaces.

Speaking . . .
Call our office to check on availability and fees for your group. A few dates are still available for 2003 and several have been booked for 2004-2005. Golden Egg-one’s a dud, five, drop everything and get ye to the theater!

Consulting . . .
After constant requests, I’ve allocated a few hours each day for consulting. By the hour or the project, you can schedule an intensive brainstorming session with me. each year, we commit to up to three health care systems to do a combination of on and off-site training, coaching and mentoring. To check available times or if you group qualifies, either call at 800-594-0800 or email me at DrJudithBriles@aol.com 

Movie Reviews . . .
If you like the movies, make sure you sign up for JB’s Movie Spots-they’re quick, snappy and let you know if a Gramma would be comfortable. Rating scale is the Golden Egg-one’s a dud, five, drop everything and get ye to the theater!